The Setup

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Abby Seymour

Abby Seymour

Bookbinder, jewelry maker

Posted

Who are you, and what do you do?

I'm Abby Seymour and I'm a Melbourne-based multidisciplinary artist who runs a small business entailing jewelry, prints and porcelain home wares. I come from a very hands on / tacile background: I have a bachelors of Printmaking and a Masters in Fine Art.

I worked as a bookbinder until my interests in bespoke trades grew and changed my focus. From this extensive ranged background, my design aesthetic diverged over many mediums - now, my main focus is my business: bespoke jewelry and home wares.

What hardware do you use?

I've got Macbook Air which I use to keep in touch with stockists, edit photos, publish HTML emails and upkeep of my online store. I use an iPhone 4 for Instagram, which is a great way of showing people in-progress works, as my process tends to be fairly intensive and lengthy. Otherwise I shoot on a Canon 50D, but most of the time I use professional photographers — they do a better job.

Computers aside, I use a Dremel drill, jewelry files, pliers, hammers, anvils, and an Orca blow torch — lots of utilitarian utensils for shaping raw porcelain.

My letterpress prints are printed on a Heidelberg windmill press, the plates are etched from my drawings in magnesium. Every one that I make begins in my sketchbook where I use pens, pencils, and watercolors to map out initial ideas and preliminary working plans.

Aside from that, my hands.

And what software?

A few online services — Big Cartel, Wufoo & Campaign Monitor power my website. Otherwise I use Photoshop & Illustrator to adapt photos for my website / magazines / publications or generally create promotional material. I use Sparrow for email, but really don't like it.

What would be your dream setup?

A big enough space to include my 2X vintage (1856 & 57') iron hand presses, 500kg guillotines, type cabinets, jewelry and ceramic equipment.

Otherwise, I'd like to get an etching press, a rolling mill and a brand new kiln. Setting up is expensive! Over time I buy new tools one by one, improving or replacing what I've been using previously.